Thank you to those who donated to the Grenfell Tower Disaster Fund

Here is an update on the money that was raised for the Grenfell Tower Disaster. We wanted to ensure that the money reached the most needy residents, as soon as possible. We identified a local charity who were working with the residents called Rugby Portobello Trust and at their suggestion used your donations to buy 45 vouchers worth £100 each for the Westfield Shopping Centre. The trust will identify the most needy families from the disaster and pass on our vouchers. Below is a photograph of Bruce Miller, Director of ODAAT, with one of the residents who lost his wife in the fire, along with Eri Gebrai from the Trust. Thank you to everyone who contributed.

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JOB ADVERT: Finance and Administration Officer

HOPE worldwide UK are seeking someone who enjoys working accurately with detailed information. They need to be diligent and hard-working and have a passion for the work and purpose of HOPE worldwide. They will have at least three years’ experience working in a finance or bookkeeping role and be happy to work in an organization with a Christian ethos and values. Some details are listed below, full details are available in the recruitment pack which can be downloaded from the website.

Job title

Finance and Administration Officer

Brief description of role

To administer and manage all aspects of financial administration at HOPE worldwide UK. This will include recording and reporting financial transactions, producing management accounts for the senior management team and for the board, involvement in the budget process, administering petty cash, managing payroll, supplier management and other duties that will help HOPE worldwide focus more effectively and efficiently on its core purpose.

 Hours to be worked

The core hours are 9am to 5.30pm, Monday to Friday, but there might be times that the post-holder will need to work extra hours when necessary. This could include being available for occasional evenings and at weekends to participate in special events like board meetings if needed. Although it is anticipated that the job will be full-time, HOPE worldwide will consider a part-time arrangement for the equivalent of four days a week.

Location of work

The role will be based at one of our London offices, either in the Angel or near the Oval. The post-holder will need to visit the other office regularly.

Salary banding

Between £25,000 to £30,000 depending on experience.

Closing date for application

Applications must be received no later than midday Friday 15 December 2017. They can be emailed to: info@hopeworldwide.org.uk

Anticipated interview dates

To be confirmed – probably within January 2018.

DBS checks

Due to the nature of the role, a criminal record check is required before a final job offer is made (see HOPE worldwide’s policy on recruiting ex-offenders).

Occupational Requirements

In light of the Christian ethos of the Charity and the nature and context of the work to be undertaken by this role, it is considered that there is an occupational requirement for the postholder to be a practising Christian in accordance with Schedule 9 Equality Act 2010.

Further information

For Recruitment pack, application form or more information, please contact us by emailing info@hopeworldwide.org.uk

Say No in November

No In November logo on blue

Addiction to drugs or alcohol is not something that all of us can relate to, but there are foods that we are more addicted to than we realise.  By sacrificing a cappuccino, latte, chocolate bar or carrot cake you experience momentarily the self control that is needed to say no and in a small way empathise with those resisting drug and alcohol addiction. Follow the instructions below and encourage your friends to do likewise.

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Memories from the Christmas 2015 volunteer trip to Kathmandu

 

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Nepal video

 

Just Giving page for Grenfell Tower Disaster

Please donate to our appeal for the Grenfell Tower disaster

https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/grenfelltowerdisaster

We have all been shocked by the Grenfell Tower disaster that took place in West London. Our thoughts and prayers are with those whose lives have been affected by this horror.

It is estimated that up to 600 people might have been made homeless by this tragedy, and it is still unclear how many people have lost their lives.

HOPE worldwide have worked with vulnerable groups in West London for many years and want to help to support the recovery from this tragedy. We have set up this fundraising page to collect money which will be used to help those affected. Please give generously to this urgent need.

Would you like to volunteer at a London night shelter?

Read about Bruce Miller’s experience of volunteering at a night shelter

Many of the night shelters around London are organised on the basis of local churches grouped into multiples of seven, each agreeing to have homeless people stay for one night per week. This involves providing an evening meal and then distributing bedding for them to sleep in the church hall, providing breakfast the following morning and then storing the labeled bedding for the same time next week. This would go on for a period of about six months starting in October and finishing in March.

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St John the Baptist Church, Isleworth where Bruce volunteered.

So there are opportunities to help with cooking the evening meal, preparation of the men’s beds for sleeping, supervising the night shift and helping with breakfast and clear up in the morning.  My wife helped to cook the evening meal and this involved taking the food down to the shelter for about 7pm and collecting the empty, washed, container at about 10pm.  Other volunteers were actually in the building serving the meal and washing and cleaning up afterwards. So there are lots of ways to serve.

I got the chance to volunteer on a Thursday morning for eight weeks, during February and March 2017, at a night shelter in St. John’s Church of England, Isleworth. The work involved being there from 6:00-7:45am supporting between twelve to fourteen homeless men along with another five or six volunteers.

Specifically this meant helping to set up the large breakfast table, then as each man woke up, putting each person’s mattress and bedding into the storage room; helping to prepare breakfast and sitting with the men and talking together over breakfast; clearing up after breakfast, then sweeping , cleaning and preparing the hall for the daycare and nursery session that was immediately to follow. It was physical work but very encouraging to engage with the homeless men and meet with other volunteers in the community.  It was also sad, as I listened to their stories of how they came to be homeless.

I remember one morning feeling sorry for myself, having to get out of bed so early, then I remembered the guys that I was about to serve.  They were in a hall, sleeping on a 2” thick sponge mattress, with no family around them, all their possessions in a rucksack, and living on the streets.  I got out of bed with a better attitude; shame on me for complaining.  Truly, it is better to give than to receive.

The time I spent quickly flew by and on the last Thursday morning I expressed to one of the other volunteers that I was sad it was finished.  It felt so good to serve, and I hope that the relationships I have formed and this small act of service will be pleasing to God.

If you would like to find out more about volunteering at night shelters over the winter please contact Jane Whitworth at jane.whitworth@hopeworldwide.org.uk

 

 

 

A Volunteer’s account of serving for two weeks at the Village of HOPE in New Delhi, India

On the evening of Boxing Day 2016 my friend Alison Clark-Morris and I flew out to Delhi to spend two weeks at the Village of Hope; a village which has been built for Leprosy sufferers and their families. Ali is a podiatrist (or, as she became known in India, “the foot doctor”) who works at a chiropractic clinic in Pangbourne and Theale Wellbeing Centre, Berkshire. The Village is run by the charity Hope Worldwide.

Volunteer podiatrist in Village of Hope

What has been achieved over 25 years was inspirational. People with leprosy not only suffer from the illness but because of the associated stigma, the whole family lose their jobs, cannot marry and are cast out of the community, usually ending up as beggars. The Village provides not just a home but also microcredit loans to set up small businesses and training in computing, nursing and sewing. The children and grandchildren of the original 800 residents are now getting jobs and building lives outside the Village.  We saw a busy, happy, vibrant place, with weddings, religious festivals and parties seemingly every day. (We were included in them all!).

Leprosy is now almost eliminated from India, only 127,326 new cases being diagnosed each year. Early detection is essential to avert disability. But for the previous generation, the infection left life-long neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet and hands leading to pain, disfigurement and loss of sensation. Loss of sensation leads to serious foot ulcers, similar to those sometimes seen on people with diabetes in the UK. It is these ulcers that, if not managed carefully, result in amputations and disability.

Volunteer nurse in Village of Hope

The bandaging clinic that treats the ulcers was where we worked alongside Raju. Raju contracted leprosy at 13 and ran away from home to protect his family and seek treatment. He was one of the lucky ones with no permanent damage. The Village trained him in wound care and while he cannot read or write he is a highly skilled medical technician, treating up to 100 patients a day. Ali’s very specialist skills made a real impact in just a fortnight, treating the ulcers and providing orthotic padding to relieve the pressure that causes the ulcers. She helped Raju further improve his skills and left a simple programme of education in self help for the residents to prevent new ulcers.

Our final job was to work with the charity to draw up an investment plan for the clinic to provide more up to date equipment (lights, steriliser, water supply etc.); a female assistant to work alongside Raju to deal with the many female leprosy sufferers who feel too ashamed to be treated by a man and finally the means for more professional podiatrists from the UK or elsewhere to visit as volunteers. Thankfully the first two of these three goals have already been achieved and there are plans for other podiatrists to go out next January. The picture below is of Raju and his new assistant.

Assistant technician in Village of Hope

Thank you to all those who have supported this worthwhile programme. If you would like to contribute to the continuing work of the Village of Hope please donate today.